DIGS: SITE ACTIVITIES

While archaeology can involve both above-ground and buried resources, when people think of "archaeology" the first thing that nearly always comes to mind is the latter; and with it, actual excavation work ... or, if you will, a "dig." And much of the OSA work which FOSA assists the OSA on involves these activities.

There are, in fact, many steps involved in a successful dig, any of which can occupy one or more days and all of which may extend over several weeks depending on the site's circumstances. These are summarized below. The accompanying pictures were taken at a number of such digs, over several years, where FOSA members participated. These should provide a good idea of what goes on at the different stages and in different kinds of sites.

For more information on field work activities, please see the Digs: Frequently Asked Questions page and, in the Special Features section, check out the Introduction to Archaeology page.

Meanwhile, click on any photo-icon below to see its larger image, and to "walk" through the gallery.


Note1: The "Field Walks" section isn't really part of formal field work activities; instead, it represents things which anyone may find him or herself doing at any time ... basically, walking around and looking at the ground trying to see what might be there. The photos in this section were taken as a result of walking about a section of farmland which had been plowed, though not recently; while a formal dig was going on in another section. This was done, of course, with the approval of the owner of the land. The artifacts shown were considered archaeologically significant by the dig supervisor, who accompanied the author, as they provide a good indication of what might exist beneath the plowed layer. Their abundance strongly suggested that this field was part of a permanent camping site for Native Americans.

The "Field Walks" section's photos will be kept separate from the photos associated with "real" field work activities below it.

Note2: The "Adult Field School" photos were taken during a class which the State Archaeologist gives annually. Hence these are images of non-archaeologists who are doing serious excavation work under his supervision.

As with the "Field Walks" section, this section's photos will also be kept separate from the photos associated with the descriptions of site excavation activities.

Note3: The "Student Field School" photos were taken during a 1-day session which the State Archaeologist, assisted by members of FOSA and the Glastonbury school system, gives for Glastonbury Middle School students. The intent of these sessions is are to acquaint the students with archaeological techniques and to make them aware of the historic and pre-historic heritage which exists in their town.

Again, this section's photos will be kept separate from the photos associated with the descriptions of site excavation activities.

Note4: The "Educators Field School" section contains information on the "Field School for Educators," also a week-long school sponsored by the CT State Museum of Natural History.

Note5: The "Selected Digs' Images section contains images from excavations which were reported in news publications, and were thus public knowledge. While taken primarily by Ken and Bonnie Beatrice of the FOSA Outreach committee, they will where available be supplemented by images from those publications.

As with the others in this group, this section's photos will be kept separate from the photos associated with the descriptions of site excavation activities.



Site Review
Site Location and Geo-Physical Survey
Test Excavations
Grid Layout
Excavate, Level by Level
Screening
What Do We Find?
Laboratory Process And Report Writing
Site Preservation



"Field Walks"
"Adult Field School"
"Student Field School"
 

 
"Educators Field School"
 

 
"Selected Digs' Images"